Top 8 Best PS4 Monitors for 2020

Welcome to our best PlayStation monitors guide.

Our team tested nearly 200+ monitors, constantly shopped on amazon, and spent more than 2000+ hours testing the monitors in our center.

Trust us, you do not want to get the wrong monitor. It’s always better to get right the first time, or you’ll waste your bucks and time. Keep reading, to know what PlayStation monitor to get.

Video gaming has become a vital part of our lives. The gaming industry is growing and blooming, making it worth $3.49 billions in 2018 as per a research done by the United States. By 2021, the gaming industry is predicted to hit $180 billions worldwide. With that being said, the gaming world is busy in introducing better and improved devices including gaming monitors.

These monitors offers plenty of benefits and features like excellent motion performance and remarkable response time. It is indeed crucial to understand every detail a PS4 monitor can offer from contrast ratio to refresh rate.

These are the top PS4 Monitors you should buy now

1. ASUS CG32UQ

Size: 31.5 inch | Resolution: 4K UHD 2160p (3840 x 2160 pixels) | Max Refresh Rate: 60Hz | Response Time: 5ms | Adaptive Sync: Free-Sync

ASUS CG32UQ is currently the best PlayStation monitor you should buy. It’s instantly apparent right out of the box that this is an ASUS screen. And that’s a good thing because when it comes to bold, solid aesthetics, the company makes some of the nicest monitors around. The style is clear in its geometric lines, from the corners of the display to the stand and base. Hexagons appear all over the architecture of the display and even penetrate and affect the menu screen layout.

There’s also a really thick bezel across the 32-inch panel. While it’s not wafer-thin as on other, maybe more ‘stylish’ monitors, it’s very much in line with the chunky general design of the CG32UQ and doesn’t look out for a place on – or at the cost of – the panel.

Nonetheless, it does take up some desk space; the screen’s base has wide controller pads as two of its three feet that fit in delightfully well with the design. However, the solid design does not limit the flexibility or adjustability of the display, and there is a good enough range of movement both up and down the stand of the display and in its forward or reverse tilt.

The CG32UQ has a plethora of exciting features; most will feel familiar with the mob of a PC gaming monitor, but all are designed to be perfect for console gaming while still maintaining the quality of a good gaming monitor. It should be said upfront while being console-focused, that this will also hold its own for PC players.

Beginning with the evident, with HDR thrown in, the screen is a VR display at a beautiful 4K resolution. It also has a DisplayHDR 600 rating, which is very good for a gaming pc though not quite as high as the best gaming tv screens. Nonetheless, you’re in for an outstanding visual and vivid experience for the eyes when you pair that with a 95 percent color gamut DCI-P3.

DCI-P3 is the dominant color space for digital cinema images and is increasingly becoming the standard benchmark that all screens are crying out for, with the high 90 percent range being a true sign of color supremacy. Simply put, 95 percent is fantastic stuff on a gaming computer.

In the game of numbers, the price of the CG32UQ has been further supported by more strong numbers: it has a peak brightness of 600 cd / m2 and a maximum contrast ratio of 3000:1. Once again, one may see higher results on a 4K Screen, but it’s nice to churn these numbers out on a gaming display.

2. LG 27UK850-W

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: 4K UHD 2160p (3840 x 2160 pixels) | Max Refresh Rate: 60Hz | Response Time: 5ms | Adaptive Sync: Free-Sync

The LG 27UK850-W has a white rear black hood, a design choice that gives it a distinctive, sleek look, very unlike anything else. The included U-Line lightweight aluminum stand has a similarly sleek, all silver look and makes a forward or backward tilt between -5 and 20 degrees. This can also be elevated and reduced to 4.7 inches.

Even the U-Line stand pivots 90 degrees, so you can transform the show to portrait. In our research, it felt easy to switch to portrait mode and back. Just the slickest modeling studio can suit the monitor and stand right in. The display does not take up much desk space, at 27 inches.

The U-Line stand has a higher magnification of about 16 inches while the display itself is just a little over 24 inches. The combination of display, stand, and cable holder has a depth of approximately 15 inches. VESA mounting is a choice with a wall mount that incorporates 100 x 100 (A x B) and four regular M4 x L10 screws, with or without a wall mounting plate.

The bezel of the monitor is incredibly thin, but the main viewing area is surrounded on the top and sides of the screen by a nearly 0.25-inch black line. The line is scarcely visible at the bottom and is about 0.1 inches wide. Nonetheless, the 27UK850-W is almost borderless, as modern display technology goes.

There are two HDMI ports on the back of the monitor, one DisplayPort, one USB-C port, and a pair of USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports that serve as a USB hub when the USB-C is attached. The upstream USB-C link operates with the DisplayPort protocol, which can provide power to an enabled device, but not from it.

This implies that when linked over a single USB-C connection, it can actually power up something more like a MacBook Pro. There is also a DC-in for the power cord and a headphone jack for headphones or external speakers should either of the video inputs play audio.

Underneath the LG logo is a single Joystick button in the center of the display that regulates the built-in functions of the display — it acts as the power button and also controls the volume. When the monitor is on, the on-screen menu is shown with a simple click of the button.

There is a Display Quality Assurance Report inside the box, a white AC adapter, a CD-ROM pack, manual and other documentation, and also a cable holder and various cables (DisplayPort, USB, HDMI, and AC cables). You can also notice two sections of the U-Line table, and the display itself.

To Windows or Mac users, there are two extra, optional software products available to install: Dual Controller and True Color Pro. Dual Controller allows people to use the shared keyboard and mouse connected to one computer to monitor several Windows and Mac computers.

3. BenQ EX3203R

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: QHD Wide 1440p (2560×1440 pixels) | Max Refresh Rate: 144Hz | Response Time: 4ms | Adaptive Sync: Free-Sync

The EX3203R is a mega look-out camera. Wide screen with minimal bezels at the front, stunning minimum stand gazing from below and an easy solution for cable management in the back. It’s easy to say the concept is right on the mark. Even the stand is very sturdy and just really easy to push around. The plugs are well placed and a good addition to the little wire covers.

The controls at the bottom of the display are convenient and click to use. The power button is distinct and illuminates. Overall a good build. The BenQ EX3203R certainly offers the visual side of things. The viewing angles are very good for a curved display and the pure bursts of colors. The panel supports HDR, and so go figure.

Bearing in mind the graphics, the EX3203R has a reaction time of 4ms. Although the refresh rate of 144Hz is fantastic and the support of FreeSync 2 helps to make the overall gaming experience better. In a competitive setting where a 3ms or more deficit can be the difference, this monitor focuses more on the daily semi-pro gamer who needs to be wowed by the view rather than the win.

Although this monitor is not of the quality of BenQ’s provided Zowie line of monitors, it certainly offers a beautiful and enjoyable gaming experience. BenQ added a sensor that adjusts the viewing experience and helps kick HDR. Each of these benefits to make the viewing experience perfect. I’d turn this off when training, but for movies and other uses, it’s perfectly perfect to have and function well.

You get all the accessories you’d need in the box; HDMI, DisplayPort, and a USB-C Adapter. It is about everything you’d need to get you started. The USB-C port on this screen makes us particularly happy as this device will be better confirmed in the future than most of the other gaming monitors.

The BenQ EX3203R Stand can be quite a looker. You can move the display up and down and even turn it back and forth a little. With great ease, this process happens, and you’ll enjoy using this stand. This nice hole is also in the back of the stand, with a chrome ring around it that allows for simple cable management. It looks super luxurious and feeds it.

4. Dell U2718Q

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: 4K UHD 2160p (3840 x 2160 pixels) | Max Refresh Rate: 60Hz | Response Time: 5ms | Adaptive Sync: G-Sync

The Dell U2718Q offers vivid, consistent, and accurate colors, based on an IPS panel with 10-bit color help (8-bit + FRC). That’s also factory-calibrated to Delta E < 2 and covers 99.9 percent of the color gamut of sRGB, making it a good display for technical color-critical work. The IPS panel also ensures large viewing angles of 178 degrees, a notable static contrast ratio of 1,300:1, and a smooth 5ms pixel transfer speed for minimal ghosting of moving objects around the screen. In addition, 4K Ultra HD resolution guarantees extremely smooth and mesmeric image quality with vibrant imagery and lots of screen immovable properties.

An HDR display should be able to produce at least 400-nit peak brightness (preferably 600 or 1,000) and cover at least 90 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamut for a significant increase in picture quality. The Dell U2718Q, by comparison, has a peak brightness of 350-nits and only covers the normal sRGB color gamut, which means that its HDR is software-emulated.

With both HDR and SDR (Standard Dynamic Range) content, the Dell U2718Q input lag measure just ~9ms, which makes it ideal with competitive sports if you don’t mind being restricted to 60Hz. Additionally, in video games and movies, the reaction time speed of only 5ms effectively removes the motion blur of fast-moving objects.

And if you’re a talented designer who also enjoys casually playing video games, the Dell U2718Q is definitely for you. Moving on, the monitor uses PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) to control brightness so you can encounter eye strain or headaches after extended use when you’re almost-sensitive to screen flicker.

Dell U2718Q supports all Display connections with HDCP 2.2. And you can watch printed version-protected content on the television in  K on Blu-rays and video services like Netflix. You can notice the following settings in the OSD (On-Screen Display): contrast, brightness, aspect ratio, sharpness, color size, color temperature, range of source inputs, RGB, hue, and saturation.

To allow HDR, go to the OSD menu to test the ‘Smart HDR’ setting. You will also find the setting for the ‘Answer Time,’ but we suggest that you leave it at the ‘Standard’ option. Eventually, various preset modes are available, including ComfortView, which filters the harmful blue lights out. Picture and Picture By Picture modes, however, do not exist.

The Dell U2718Q 27′′ 4K IPS display features a premium design with complete adjustable support like height adjustment up to 130 mm, -/+ 45 ° swivel, -5 ° /20 ° tilt, 90 ° turn, and VESA mount compatibility up to 100 x 100 mm. Connectivity includes HDMI 2.0a, DisplayPort 1.2, mini-DisplayPort 1.2, a port for headphones,, and a socket for quad-USB 3.0. Keep in mind that HDR is only supported via the HDMI port.

5. ASUS VG279Q

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: Full HD (1920 x 1080) | Max Refresh Rate: 144Hz | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: Free-Sync

The ASUS VG279Q is a 1080p 144Hz IPS gaming monitor with AMD FreeSync, fast response time, and a completely ergonomic layout. The ASUS VG279Q 27′′ 1080p 144Hz gaming screen is based on AU Optronics’ IPS panel with a peak brightness of 400 nits and a response time of 3ms (GtG). This is a small but significant improvement over this caliber’s previous generation IPS displays with a peak brightness of 300-350 nits and a 4-5ms response time of GtG (Blue to White pixel transition). Certain panel specific specs are common including a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1 and a color depth of 8-bit (6-bit + 2-bit FRC) representing the traditional sRGB color gamut.

This implies the image on this display is rather pixelated while a 24′′ or 25′′ version of the monitor will have finer and clearer images. This is not as noticeable in video games , particularly when you are applying such anti-aliasing effects. Nevertheless, if you do wish to use the ASUS VG279Q for work, you will have to cope with restricted screen space and smudgy data.

The reaction time of 3ms (GtG) is more than adequate for a smooth high paced multiplayer experience without influential ghosting and motion blur. Essentially, in regards to providing vivid colors and large viewing angles of 178 degrees horizontally and vertically, you get a response time output that is on paired with TN models.

In addition, you can use the proprietary ASUS Extreme Low Motion Blur (ELMB) backlight flashing strobe technology to obtain a CRT-like motion clarity. You’ll need to adjust your screen refresh rate to either 85Hz, 100Hz, or 120Hz to enable this. The output of the ASUS VG279Q input lag is quite good as well as about 4ms which makes the screen easily fit for professional gaming.

The ASUS VG279Q is also configured with the help of AMD FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync, which allows the monitor to dynamically adjust its refresh rate while eliminating all screen flickering and stuttering with virtually no input lag. Such a system includes a graphics card compatible with AMD FreeSync and it operates within the refresh rate range (VRR) variable 40-144Hz / FPS (Frames Per Second).

The adaptive-sync also operates with GPUs (and newer) of the NVIDIA 1000 series and 2000 series without any issues on that display. In addition, LFC (Low Framerate Compensation) is supported which will facilitate a seamless efficiency of 40 frames per second even south of it. Note that Adaptive-Sync and 1ms MPRT are not capable of operating simultaneously.

Certain apps include the usual bells and whistles found on ASUS game displays such as GamePlus (crosshairs, timers, and an FPS counter), GameVisual (FPS, RTS, Racing, RPG, MOBA, sRGB, Cinema, Scenery picture presets), and Shadow Boost for improved visibility of items in dark game areas.

6. BenQ RL2755

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 (1080p) Full HD | Max Refresh Rate: 75Hz | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: Free-Sync

The sleek, black style of the BenQ RL2755HM feels super spacious at first glance but there are a few cool features concealed throughout for console gamers. The long, triangular base of the screen is wrapped with a rubber strip at the top, expected to protect your controllers in place. 

The RL2755HM can be angled 15 degrees backwards or 5 degrees forward — unfortunately , you can’t move it any more. In contrast, the extremely versatile XL series displays from BenQ can be lifted, rotated, and pivoted in a variety of ways, even though they are considerably more costly. The RL2755HM is relatively lightweight and compact for a 27-inch display, measuring 25.2 x 18.8 x 8.4 inches and 12.2 pounds.

The RL2755HM is equipped to control several devices at once, with two HDMI ports as well as inputs from DVI-D and D-Sub. There is a line-in port and a 3.5-mm headphone jack for the sound. The lack of a DisplayPort could scare off PC gamers, but for the console crowd, the RL2755HM is quite clearly built.

You can find a visible power button at the bottom-right edge of the display, with five clickable navigation buttons above it. Tapping one of the buttons provides choices for swapping inputs, choosing a picture mode, changing the black equalizer and exploring a deeper main menu that allows you to change a number of configurations.

Video games usually look bright and vibrant on the 27-inch, 1080p display of the RL2755HM, but it became obvious after a few days with the monitor that this is a screen made more for professional gamers than those who want immersive image quality.

BenQ ‘s display has proven to be a worthy partner for console games like Gears of War: Ultimate Edition and Halo: The Master Chief Collection, both running fluidly at 1080p and 60 frames per second. Slipping in and out of the cover in Gears felt fast and sensitive, as did blowing the heads off enemy aliens in Halo.

7. BenQ EW3280U

Size: 32 inch | Resolution: 4K UHD 3840×2160 resolution | Max Refresh Rate: 60Hz | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: FreeSync

The BenQ EW3280U has a regularly BenQ-style in its plan: its square base is basic and solid and doesn’t encroach a lot on the work area; however, its huge screen size (32-inches) implies it has some mass and heave over the work area for the most part. While the impression isn’t gigantic, which is extraordinary, this board would be more at home in a bigger arrangement or more extensive one: having it very close in a little or minimal gaming or office space isn’t its regular environment and is somewhat overpowering.

Put a touch of room between your eyes and the screen, in any case, and it’s a delight. The size methods there is undoubtedly not an immense scope of development to the screen – inclining is about is acceptable as it gets – however, this is worthy.

The speakers which embellish the base ‘bezel’ are incredible and joined with the back one, do give an appropriate implicit sound choice in case you’re not almost a standout amongst other gaming headsets, for reasons unknown. Generally speaking, the screen is charming to take a gander at and is an accomplishment in feel; even the copper-earthy colored style of the shading over the base, bezels, and screen back is pleasant.

The refresh rate of this monitor is 60Hz. In the overall domain of gaming screens, these are simply OK. As a matter of first importance, that begins with an IPS board, pervaded with BenQ’s HDR. This is dazzling and keeping in mind that not the most genuine type of the shading tech, it is an invite augmentation of the shading reach and introduction one can jump on a 4K IPS board with a 95% DCI-P3 shading array.

Availability is quite standard; however will have you all around secured. On the screen, you have two HDMIs and one DisplayPort, just as a USB-C port as well. The last is a specific euphoria and makes it simpler than at any other time to associate with a scope of gadgets and PCs. Additionally on the screen are some quite acceptable implicit speakers.

8. Razer Raptor

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: WQHD (2560×1440) | Max Refresh Rate: 144Hz | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: G-Sync Compatible & AMD FreeSync

The rectangular base is positioned in lockstep with the screen’s horizontal axis, which ensures that any aesthetically fussy gamers like me who need to keep their keyboards off-angle to play comfortably will be forced to cart the display back into their desks a bit to set up for competitive supremacy.

First, there’s the entirely special back of this package, where the stand even acts as a cable boss. The rear portion of the stand allows you to connect the (admittedly very neon green) cables that Razer supplies with the display from the bottom of the panel, down the stand via precut channels, and out to your Mac.

Also, the screen’s rear panel is covered in fabric — a further first in gaming displays — and while it takes some getting used to, I’m a massive supporter of the materials option. There’s such an ineffable beauty to it, something that needs to be seen (and felt) to be appreciated.

Lastly, although I am not usually a fan of RGB lighting on gameplay monitors because of its propensity to be too intense and to blur out the images on the screen. A single, discreet RGB LED strip wraps around the stand’s foundation, and it gently bounces off your desk. You can configure it to any customized pattern you want; it’s managed via the software suite Razer Synapse 3.

The monitor is progressively flexible, from the bottom of the panel to the desk subject to a total distance of 5.25 inches, and the stand supports an incredible tilt range: up to 90 degrees.