Top 11 Best 144Hz Monitors for 2020

Welcome to hip digital media’s guide to the best 144Hz monitors. There are alot of features available now for gamers but they aren’t just restricted to PC specs or consoles anymore, it’s more than that. For a good gaming experience a top notch quality monitor is required which has the best refresh rate. The higher is the refresh rate, clearer and smoother the motions. One of the most demanded refresh rates nowadays is 144Hz. Anything above that can be a little more extra.

Basically a 144Hz monitor works perfectly for multitasking purposes but is more recommended for gamers. As the screen is designed in such a way that you will feel the motions and speed virtually. The whole gaming experience will change to 360. So gamers will get an opportunity to make fast reactions, the clear image and resolutions will enhance the gaming experience and lower the fatigue levels.

These are the top 144hz Monitors you should buy now

1. Asus MG279Q

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: WQHD (2560 x 1440) | Response Time: 4ms | Adaptive Sync: Free Sync | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

It incorporates AMD’s anti-tearing FreeSync technology with a ultra fast refresh rate to offer ultra-smooth computer action. It utilizes an In-Plane Switching (IPS) panel to provide decent gray and view angle output and is fitted with four digital video inputs, a variety of USB 3.0 ports, and various gaming functions.

FreeSync is AMD ‘s contribution to the G-Sync anti-tearing and smoothing technologies used by Nvidia. Both require care of the refresh levels to prevent screen tearing, a phenomenon that occurs when a computer with a set refresh rate tries to keep pace with the graphics card. Tearing creates a split-screen effect when it shows two frame sections concurrently.

The MG279Q lacks the edgy elegance of the BenQ XL2730Z and Acer Predator X34 versions but it is still a good looking panel. It has a steel, 2.5-inch cabinet with narrow (0.4-inch) bezels and a smooth, glare-proof coating. The cabinet has four VESA mounting holes and is backed by a wedge-shaped foundation and mounting arm offering a height of 5.9 inches and a tilt of 25 degrees. All I / O ports of the MG279Q are situated at cabinet middle.

There are four action buttons on the right side of the fridge, a Control button and a five-way jog dial that allows it easier to access the settings menus. The GameVisual settings are photo templates that are designed and involve Landscape, Cycling, Film, RTS / RPG (Real-Time Strategy / Role-Playing Game), FPS (First Person Shooter), and sRGB mode.

There are five Blue Light Filter settings (including Off) to help minimize eye pressure, three Skin Tone settings (Reddish, Regular, and Yellowish), and four Color Temperature settings (Cool, Normal, Natural, and User), in comparison to the Brightness and Contrast settings. There is also an ECO mode, which flickers the brightness of the panel to conserve energy.

In contrast to the GameVisual settings, the MG279Q uses Asus’ GamePlus technology that includes four separate crosshair targeting overlays and an in-game timer to keep track of items like respawn times and playing times overall. Other configurations include TraceFree (speeds up the response of pixels), VividPixel (enhances the default images), and ASCR (dynamic contrast).

2. LG 34GN850-B

Size: 34 inch | Resolution: Curved QHD (3440 x 1440) | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The panel is circular and has slim bezels on both edges. Contrast with other LG UltraGear models, it is a little special. The LG 34GN850-B is designed with good accuracy. The LG 34GN850-B has a sub-par contrast ratio, as is anticipated from the majority of IPS screens. This makes blacks appear grayish, especially in a dark environment. Great brightness peak SDR. For moderately-lit spaces, this is bright enough. Happily, when you show various material, there is almost no difference in brightness.

Centered on LG’s Nano IPS screen, the LG 34GN850 offers amazingly bright and punchy colors filling 98 percent of the DCI-P3 color space. Thankfully, the LG 34GN850 has an emulated sRGB video image mode. This mode will restrict the color performance to ~100 percent sRGB, enabling you to experience a more detailed color representation for sRGB material.

If you’re viewing content from sRGB or DCI-P3, you’ll get accurate, clear, and stunning colors! It has a peak brightness of 400-nits which ensures that even in well-lit rooms it can get more than light enough whilst the static contrast ratio corresponds to 1000:1.The LG 34GN850 has 178 ° wide viewing angles enabling you to show the picture at virtually every angle without compromising the image in some way. However, the 3440/1440 screen resolution results in great pixel density on the 34′′ frame scale of the device. With approximately 110 pixels per inch, you get ample of storage room and clear text/details without any required scaling.

Ultra-wide format 21:9 makes accessible games, images, and movies even more interactive, and you even get extra horizontal workspace for flexibility and editing jobs. The LG 34GN850 panel embraces HDR, but a computer will require even higher brightness and contrast for a significant increase in HDR picture quality. It has a very low ~4ms input lag which results in an imperceptible delay between your commands and the screen response. The reaction speed, which is the rate at which pixels move from one color to another, is also outstanding! There are four overdrive reaction time modes: Off, Normal, Fast, and Faster.

3. Samsung CHG90

Size: 49 inch | Resolution: FHD Ultra Wide Plus 1080p (3840 X 1080 pixels) | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: FreeSync | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The CHG90 is not a panel of gimmicks. It is a high-quality product and also just appears to have an aspect ratio of 32:9. It supports FreeSync 2 with HDR and a 144Hz refresh rate. The reproduction is detailed and rich in color. It utilizes QLED software from the company inside a VA screen. Like with other recent Samsung models, it has outstanding response times in the range from 5ms to 9ms. It switches faster from white to black than from black to white, but it is still quick enough to prevent the ghosting effect when pictures linger longer than they need to.

The giant curved screen of the CHG90, the size of two 1080p positioned side by side, offers a highly interactive gameplay environment. You’ll need a table or desk with a minimum of four feet of horizontal room to accommodate the width. The CHG90 performs great in rendering recent titles, so you can even use it for multitasking in the workplace with many windows open for spreadsheets and the like. The panel of this 49-inch has a screen resolution of 3,840 by 1,080 pixels, the equivalent of two 1080p mounted next to each other.

The foundation of the CHG90 is robust, with its V-shaped arms measuring 32 inches by themselves. The stand of the CHG90 facilitates height, tilt, and swivel shift. The CHG90 is graded as “1800R” curvature, among the tightest we’ve seen.

The interface range involves two HDMI cables, one full-size and one micro DisplayPort adapter, one upstream and two downstream USB ports, an audio-in connection, and one headphone socket.

4. ViewSonic Elite XG240R

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: WQHD (2560×1440) | Response Time: 4ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The Elite ViewSonic show series offers gaming screens at competitive pricing. We are trying out a value like that today, the XG240R. It’s size is 24 inches, 1080p, TN panel with a refresh rate of 144Hz, and a superfast response. This still has FreeSync, and it can also operate G-Sync effectively according to ViewSonic and checked by our tests.

The XG240R features the Elite RGB in addition to its output specifications, which has a sleek LED effect on the back of the panel that integrates with LED-equipped equipment such as CPU coolers, keyboards, and power supplies. You should search the website of ViewSonic for compatible hardware. All that interface with Razer, Thermaltake and Cooler Master applications fits with the Elite RGB console from ViewSonic.

The Elite range of ViewSonic is distinguished by strong, industrial style with only enough signs to make it obvious that you are staring at a gaming monitor. The screen has a proportional thickness of about 2.5 inches. The back is the Elite LED RGB lighting effect, along with a molded-in design that reminds us of the hull of a starship. A small grill at the peak extends from side to side and creates no heat during long hours of gameplay.

The large stand has an adjustment in height of 4.7 inches and a swivel of 45 degrees on all sides and a turn of 5/20 degrees forwards and backward. Portrait mode is also 90-degree. The foundation is a large plate formed onto its plastic cover with a cool brushed-look finish. It’s fairly large and should keep the monitor from tipping over in anything of the most severe earthquakes. All motions on stands are solid.

Bargains are hard to find when you load on features like adaptive sync (like AMD FreeSync or Nvidia G-Sync) and high refresh rates. But there are good gaming deals if you look hard enough. The OSD is unique to the ViewSonic Elite line. It starts with gaming options, like play-specific modes and a FreeSync toggle. If you want to run G-Sync, turn this on so the Nvidia control panel will recognize the XG240R. The OSD also features full image control with six picture modes and calibration options.

No effort is made by the bezels to cover, and the anti-glare layer sits back a few millimeters and refuses light well without producing grain in the background. Controls for (OSD) consist of five tiny buttons and a control toggle. These protrude from the panel’s bottom right corner and press with a strong sound, rendering configuration adjustments fast job.

The all-digital input panel includes two HDMI 1.4s and one DisplayPort 1.2. If you go the path you would need to use the following for G-Sync. There are one USB 3.0 port upstream and two downstream. Headphone users should put in a 3.5 mm port, or the stereo audio is built-in.

In Standard picture mode, you may make all appropriate adjustments to the shot. You get six variations for the light temp and six for the gamma. The default temperature for the hue is Natural, which runs a little gray. The RGB sliders are exposed when flipping to complete color power. Using a black stabilizer option, you can also change the level of shadow detail. A blue light feature warms the color temperature for those long sessions.

Along with the serial number and overdrive status, the info screen has all the necessary resolution and refresh rate information. The top of each OSD screen refreshes rate, active input, FreeSync status, and RGB Elite status.

5. Acer Predator XB271HU

Size: 24 inch | Resolution: FHD 1080p 1920×1080 | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The first aspect you’ll observe about the Acer Predator XB1 is it’s fitted together incredibly well. The durable stand with broad feet and a strong neck hold the big, 27-inch screen securely fixed in place. Mount it onto the stand, plug it in, and the next items you’ll note are the wafer-thin bezels and crisp 1440p picture. Acer ‘s game models line Predator XB1 sports either IPS or TN panels and varies from a 1080p size of 23.8-inch to a 4K size of 32-inch. Our Predator XB1 comparison device (model XB271HU) lies in the middle; it sports a 27-inch, Nvidia G-Sync IPS screen, a response time of 4ms and a refresh rate can be overclocked to 165 Hz.

Acer needs you to understand at first sight that the Predator XB1 is designed for games, so far as its architecture goes. It features offensive packaging, coupled with the violent label Predator. The tall, red feet at the base can not be overlooked. They are polished aluminum with an angled shape that reminds of a Transformer. 

The wide neck offers a lot of versatility for that reason. It helps you to move it 30 degrees in any direction while at the same time having six inches of height adjustment and 40 degrees of tilt adjustment. The strong, broad base and thick neck prevent the show from slipping or wobbling no matter how you put it.

The only way out of the all-black style is the Transformer-like Predator emblem and name insignia on the bottom bezel and the illumination next to the power switch, which glows blue while it is on. The bezel on the left and top of the frame is almost non-existent, while the bottom bezel is only 0.9 inches long.

Five keys to control the OSD in rest next to the power button in the lower right. The buttons don’t have a power as intuitive as the small joystick you’ll see on certain TVs, but after a few days, you’ll get the hang of it. It includes two video inputs: a DisplayPort, and an HDMI.

The panel includes one upstream USB port and four downstream 3.0 USB ports for other networking content. The downstream ports are split, with two on the back panel, and two on the display’s left edge. Finally, the back panel includes a 3.5 mm audio jack for external speakers or headphones.

Both in Battlefield and Counter-Strike: Regional Attack, quick-moving sequences seemed normal, without stuttering, except with hurried, rapid pans to hit targets. G-Sync, by Nvidia, did his thing to keep tearing.

6. LG 34UC79G-B

Size: 34 inch | Resolution: FHD 1080p 2560 x 1080 | Response Time: 5ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The LG 34UC79G-B is nice in design. The stand base appears identical to the LG UM69 G except this model allows for height modification, making it easy to find a suitable viewing spot. All the inputs are positioned on the back.

The stand appears fantastic and is somewhat close to the LG UM69G. It does well support it and feels very secure. The footprint is relatively growing. The rear of the 34 “panel looks fine. All the inputs are positioned out of the rear of the UC79 G, and the back of it offers a path for cable control. The LG 34UC79G-B has a reasonable contrast ratio and is pretty nice for an IPS Panel, although at about 1400:1, that is better than both the LG 27UD68P-B and the LG 29UM69G-B. As is common with IPS-type LCDs, when viewed from the sides the black level does not adjust dramatically, giving the picture a strong contrast from all viewing angles.

Really good angle of vertical view. In this way the LG 34UC79G-B works higher than normal and, due to its horizontal viewing angle, its black degree is retained even when seen from the sides. The LG 34UC79G-B’s gray uniformity is impressive. This LG gets good precision out of the package. At all brightness rates, the LG 34UC79G-B has a flicker-free backlight which is fantastic. Using its ‘1ms Motion Blur Reduction’ functionality, it can also attach optional flicker for use as Black Frame Insertion to cover up motion as seen in the BFI video.

Pretty high native refresh rate, with a wide range of FreeSync. The native FreeSync range of the (50-144 Hz) is wide enough for the Low-Frequency Compensation (LFC) feature of the graphics card to operate, transmitting double or triple frames when the framerate decreases below 50Hz to easily expand the range to 120Hz.

7. Acer XFA240 bmjdpr

Size: 24 inch | Resolution: FHD 1080p 1920×1080 | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

Nevertheless, the XFA240 was the first of its type to be classified as G-SYNC compliant by NVIDIA. It is centered on a 350-nit peak brightness TN screen, a 1,000:1 constant contrast ratio, 8-bit color depth (6-bit + 2-bit FRC), and 160 ° /170 ° viewing angles.

Other features include 1080p resolution which results in sharp and clear image quality on the Acer XFA240 24′′ panel. Of course, 1440p or 4K will give you significantly screen room,

The rapid reaction time helps the pixels to transition nearly instantaneously from one hue to another, which in effect prevents ghosting and motion blur in quick-paced action. The Acer XFA240 input latency is ~6ms and is ideal for competitive gaming because there is no perceivable pause between the inputs and the effect on the show. 

Notice that backlight is flicker-free because it does not use PWM to control illumination, and you don’t have to stress about headaches if you are prone to flickering. If you have a graphics card compliant with Adaptive-Sync (FreeSync), you should be able to harness the maximum power of the Acer XFA240 gaming console. The FreeSync system prevents screen distortion and stuttering by enabling it to adjust the refresh rate according to the frame rates of the GPU, thus granting you a variable refresh rate (VRR).

MD LFC is often enabled which ensures that the refresh rate it will double or triple the frame rate for a better output even though the FPS score falls below 48. At the base of the bezel, there are six hotkeys that can be used as shortcuts for the following functions: switching between the game modes, modifying the overdrive feature, accessing the OSD screen, changing the source of the data, modifying the sound, and turning on / off the computer.

The Acer XFA240 also provides additional enhancements to it, such as gamma presets and 6-axis hue/saturation. Other gameplay apps include ‘Black Stage’ to render darker games more noticeable and ‘Goal Range,’ which consists of customized crosshair overlays. The Acer XFA240 features complete ergonomic assistance with a height change of up to 150 mm, -5 ° /35 ° pitch, 90 ° hinge and + /- 60 ° swivel.

8. AOC Agon AG271QG

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: Full HD 2560×1440 | Response Time: 4ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The AOC AG271QG is a gaming monitor of 27 inches that packs in a range of luxury apps. Its IPS LCD panel provides excellent image quality, has an ideal resolution of 2560 x 1440, can refresh at 165Hz, has a reaction time of 4ms, and contains Nvidia’s G-Sync technology.

AOC have a clear style across their all models. This is the case for the AG271QG and the Freesync-touting AG271FZ. Typical designs include a sturdy metal stand, a black frame with a faint imitation polished metal impact on the bottom bezel, and a matt black plastic rear with a large V-shaped red plastic board running over it. All in all, it looks fairly good, particularly thanks to the price stand, but the touches of gold, the fake metal, and the absence of a low-profile bezel indicate it doesn’t have the designer feel of the likes of the Dell S1716DG or Asus PG279Q. AOC is indeed very fresh to the gaming industry, so this inexperience shows only a little bit.

Nevertheless, it is definitely well placed together, with its robust stand and frame that gives it a comforting solidity. Furthermore, the stand provides quick and accurate modifications anytime you choose to shift about in your chair without missing image orientation. The stand offers height, tilt, rotate, and pivot change in terms of functions so that you can twist and transform the show any way you want. The stand also has a handheld dial on it, so that you can still change your model to the appropriate height. The stand is locked in place and can be disconnected so that now an alternate install compliant with VESA 100×100 mm can be used.

There are several bonus controls at the back of the show. A headphone stand flips down from the right side and underneath is a set of 3.5 mm audio jacks alongside a few USB 3.0 ports, one of which supplies standby control. This ensures that the port will provide power to your computers, like a computer, even though it is turned off.

The remainder of the ports is at the red panel’s underside. The camera interfaces and microphone pass through are on the right, while you face the back of the panel, while the left is home to the power socket, two extra USB ports, and access from the USB center. The computer needs an additional power block, like other G-Sync models, and you’ll need to make space under your desk somewhere.

The controls themselves are normal keys that rest on the underside of the panel, rather than contact keys. It comes with the stand not connected because it requires screws to tie together so make sure you have a reliable Philips screwdriver. Alternatively, it can be conveniently plugged in and placed however you want, thanks to the excellent adjustable frame. AOC also provides all the cables you’ll need with power, DisplayPort, HDMI, 3.5mm jack audio, and USB uplink all included.

9. BenQ ZOWIE XL2411P

Size: 24 inch | Resolution: FHD 1080p 1920×1080 | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

The BenQ ZOWIE XL2411P is a 24′′ monitor with 1080p 144Hz 1ms targeted at extreme professional gamers. In reality, the renowned ZOWIE from BenQ are the official monitors for numerous eSports tournaments like DreamHack, ESL, MGL, and so on.

The BenQ ZOWIE XL2411P is centered on a regular TN screen with a peak brightness of 350-nit, a contrast ratio of 1,000:1, and a color depth of 8-bit for 16.7 million colors. It features 1920 range1080 pixel Maximum HD screen resolution which makes it simple for your GPU to hit high frame rates even while offering a solid pixel density on a 24-inch panel.

Although the short input latency guarantees immediate reaction to your instructions, the speed of the rapid response time prevents the ghosting and trailing of artifacts that travel quickly. You get what you need for successful skilled gaming.

BenQ is recognized for its high-quality motion blur elimination technology that completely prevents motion blur. You can notice the ‘Blur Reduction’ function in the OSD menu, which if allowed strobes the backlight and thereby eliminates perceived motion blur and ghosting for CRT-like visibility of motion.

Also, the Black eQualizer improves visibility in dark scenes and makes it easier for you to spot enemies hidden in shadows. It also includes pre-calibrated image settings with two FPS levels, one RTS mode, and three Gamer profiles that can be customized.

The BenQ XL2411P’s gadget geek-inspired architecture comprises of detailed ergonomics including 90 ° twist, + /- 45 ° left and right swivel, -5 ° /20 ° turn, height change up to 130 mm, and 100×100 mm holes for VESA install. The frame is designed especially to reduce reflections, as well as providing a transparent anti-glare coating. Dual-Link DVI, DisplayPort, and HDMI ports are provided.

10. Dell Gaming S2716DGR

Size: 27 inch | Resolution: QHD Wide 1440p 2560 x 1440 | Response Time: 1ms | Adaptive Sync: G-SYNC  | Refresh Rate: 144 Hz

Dell has also established the ultra-thin bezel style over the last few years. The computer picture relative to the bezel is just 8 mm. That is expanded to 15 mm by the badge bar along the rim. The only visible sign of an emphasis being on gaming is the Nvidia G-Sync sticker on the gray frame. The control panel buttons are on the right side, below the bottom bezel.

Once it is turned on, the control button has a switch that reflects a green glow. The light flashes steadily in sleep mode. As it is pointed to, it can rotate 90 degrees in either direction. The height of it can be set to 130 mm, it can swivel 45 degrees left or right and it can turn up to 5 degrees forward and 21 degrees backward.

When you’re using an Nvidia GPU, the G-Sync platform is a must and the low reaction time makes you successful. Its native 1440p resolution is a step up from other fast gaming consoles, maxing out at 1080p.

Connectivity for Dell screens is also a strong point and this is no different. It includes DisplayPort and HDMI interfaces as well as four USB 3.0 ports — two on the side, and two on the rear. HDMI interfaces often provide the audio pass-through. Around 93 percent of the sRGB range is provided by the Dell, which may sound like a ton — but even inexpensive models usually stretch into the high 90s and both of the 1440p listed above output 100 percent straight out. AdobeRGB protects 69 percent, while both Asus and Acer hit the mid-70s.